Recent Posts

Dogs of War by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Tchaikovsky really excels at finding interesting ways to comment on society through the use of animals in science fiction and fantasy settings. In his Echoes of the Fall series, each group is a different animal and exhibits particular social traits based on those they display in the animal kingdom. In ...

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The Snowman: He’s taunting us…

Crime dramas always strike me as struggling on the big screen. It is undoubtedly an opinion arising from my upbringing, but a detective story is often well-suited to the serialised format of TV. The limited running time of a film necessarily truncates the time spent on an extended investigation or ...

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The Death of Stalin: We need change

Censorship! State execution! Gulags! This is the stuff great comedy is made of. The Death of Stalin is an adaptation of a French graphic novel being brought to the screen by satirical maestro Armando Iannucci. The helmsman behind The Thick of It and Veep turns his gaze to a historical ...

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Calls for Submission by Selena Chambers

I can’t remember where exactly it was that I stumbled across a recommendation for Selena Chambers’ debut collection of short stories, Calls for Submission. What I do remember, however, was how the collection was described as weird and offputting. Such a description immediately had me intrigued. An offputting female writer exploring ...

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The Orville: A Star Trek pastiche

How many episodes should a series need to work out what it’s about? No, I don’t mean the audience working it out, but the show itself. The Orville can’t seem to decide what it is going for. Is it a spoof? Is it serious? Is it just all about the dick ...

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Reviews

Dogs of War by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Tchaikovsky really excels at finding interesting ways to comment on society through the use of animals in science fiction and fantasy settings. In his Echoes of the Fall series, each group is a different animal and exhibits particular social traits based on those they display in the animal kingdom. In ...

Read More »

The Snowman: He’s taunting us…

Crime dramas always strike me as struggling on the big screen. It is undoubtedly an opinion arising from my upbringing, but a detective story is often well-suited to the serialised format of TV. The limited running time of a film necessarily truncates the time spent on an extended investigation or ...

Read More »

The Death of Stalin: We need change

Censorship! State execution! Gulags! This is the stuff great comedy is made of. The Death of Stalin is an adaptation of a French graphic novel being brought to the screen by satirical maestro Armando Iannucci. The helmsman behind The Thick of It and Veep turns his gaze to a historical ...

Read More »

Calls for Submission by Selena Chambers

I can’t remember where exactly it was that I stumbled across a recommendation for Selena Chambers’ debut collection of short stories, Calls for Submission. What I do remember, however, was how the collection was described as weird and offputting. Such a description immediately had me intrigued. An offputting female writer exploring ...

Read More »

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Creative Industries

Features

Nostalgic Impulse: Blade Runner

With a new latter-day sequel trudging across cinema screens, we are provided with a great opportunity to review the iconic cyberpunk noir masterpiece Blade Runner. Established now with a pristine reputation, the film was initially released to critical derision and a ghastly performance at the box office. Director Ridley Scott, ...

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Nostalgic Impulse: Gladiator (2000)

I’m not sure how I managed to avoid watching this film for so long. It isn’t as though it is an under the radar classic. For years, friends have been lecturing me about watching it, which prompts me (contrary bastard that I am) to push it further down the ‘to ...

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Binge watching: The IT Crowd

Two IT guys and an attractive woman walk into a bar… she must be a work colleague. Graham Linehan’s The IT Crowd is all about stereotypes. The humour is almost entirely derived from stereotypes of computer geeks as well as computer-illiterate women. For the most part, it works. It is ...

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Nostalgic Impulse: Tank Girl

Tank Girl was barely a blip on the radar when it was released in 1995. It flopped both with critics and audiences, only recouping in US$6 million of its $25 million production budget. Critics tended to agree on its faults: that it had lots of spunk but it wasn’t as ...

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